Advisors

Omolola Ogunyemi
Omolola Ogunyemi
Faculty Advisor
Lola Ogunyemi is a computer scientist and biomedical informatics researcher. Her research interests include computerized medical decision support, reasoning under uncertainty, 3D graphics and visualization, and machine learning. Her current research focuses on developing and evaluating novel computerized decision support systems for different biomedical domains, including diabetes, trauma, breast cancer, depression, chronic kidney disease, and HIV. She is currently working on a National Library of Medicine-funded R01 grant to explore diabetic retinopathy prediction from clinical data using different machine learning strategies. She has been principal investigator on a National Library of Medicine-funded R01 study of computerized decision support for penetrating trauma, and on a National Cancer Institute-funded R03 study of individualized breast cancer risk prediction using Bayesian networks. She is currently Director of Charles Drew University's Center for Biomedical Informatics and a co-leader of the UCLA CTSI's biomedical informatics program. She is also an Associate Adjunct Professor of Radiological Sciences in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA with the Medical Imaging Informatics group.

Dr. Ogunyemi holds an undergraduate degree in Computer Science from Barnard College, New York, and an M.S.E, and Ph.D. in Computer and Information Science from the University of Pennsylvania. Before moving to Charles Drew University to become the Director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics, Dr. Ogunyemi was a biomedical informatics f aculty member in the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School from 1999 until 2007. She was also a member of the affiliated faculty in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology from 2003 until 2007. She served as a faculty member in the Boston-area National Library of Medicine-funded biomedical informatics fellowship training program (1999-2007).

She has taught graduate level biomedical informatics courses in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, at UCLA, at CDU, and short courses on informatics at the University of Natal, Durban, South Africa. She served as an editorial board member of the journal Computers in Biology and Medicine from 2007 until 2013. She served on the National Library of Medicine's Biomedical Library and Informatics Review Committee study section from 2003-2007 and on the National Library of Medicine's Literature Selection and Technical Review Committee from 2010-2014 as a member and as chair (2013-2014). She is currently an editorial board member for the Journal of Biomedical Informatics (2015 - 2018) and a member of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Health Information Technology Research study section (2016 - 2019).
Jesse Engelberg
Jesse Engelberg
Industry Advisor
Jesse Engelberg is the Lead Data Scientist at Heal, a company that performs on-demand doctor house calls in California and beyond. His work focuses on the foundations of business analytics, intelligent doctor assignment, and understanding supply and demand in complex environments. Jesse is passionate about improving quality and access to healthcare in developed and developing markets. He strongly believes that high quality care is a universal right and we should do everything we can to create and augment effective healthcare systems.

Before Heal, Jesse worked at 23andMe as a senior data scientist, where he focused on solving business problems for the company's direct-to-consumer genetics testing products, as well as understanding how to improve customer engagement, a key component in the company's research efforts on the contributions of genetics to health and disease. Previously Jesse worked on software products for pathologist education, and at UC Davis he led efforts on quality improvement in breast cancer care. In his work as a Pathology Informatics Fellow at UC Davis, he used computational methods to compare breast cancer histopathology labs, leading to establishment of best-practices and collaboration across various labs within the University of California system.

Jesse received his PhD in Bioengineering from the UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering. His research at UCSF involved creating computer simulations of biological systems, allowing collaborators to understand the development of simple organ development. Throughout his career Jesse has worked on various projects and hackathons, including ones dedicated to improving patient care, tools for foster youth, undergraduate education, and more.